How can I learn to think differently about food?

Changes in the way you think about food do not happen overnight. It can be a long process, but for most people it results in a healthier way of life and long-term weight management that does not involve the negative emotions and thoughts that roller-coaster dieting brings along with it. It doesn't involve calorie-counting and doesn't rely on 'allowed foods' and 'banned foods' which encourage negative thinking. Most people who learn to love eating healthily then find that they no longer find processed foods, or those that are rich in sugar or fat, as attractive as they once thought they were.

Thinking differently about portions and proportions.

 

It's not always the types of food that are the problem - sometimes its just the amounts that need to change. You can learn how to balance your plate so that you receive the right amounts of certain food groups which can encourage weight loss but at the same time enable you to feel full and satisfied after a meal.

Thinking differently about the foods you don't want to give up.

 

If your favourite food is chocolate, then banning it altogether is only likely to make you think about it more. Many foods can be adapted to provide you with less of the empty calories and more of the nutrients you need for good health. It only takes a few simple changes to make a burger or a pizza into a healthy and nutritious meal and there are even ways in which cake or chocolate can be packed full of nutrients allowing you to enjoy small amounts of these foods on occasions.

Thinking differently about hunger - how to make choices that leave you satisfied.

 

Hunger is often associated with weight loss because traditional dieting involves 'less food', but hunger pangs lead to cravings and contribute to the feeling of deprivation. Hormones circulate in the body which control feelings of hunger and of satiety and the types of food that you eat can influence how hungry you feel later in the day. Learning to choose the right types of foods at the right times can help to prevent the hunger pangs that lead to snacking, as well as provide you with the nutrients that you need for good health.

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